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Discover the Llŷn Peninsula’s Best Beaches 

Published on 21 Jun 2020 by Amy Greenwood

International travel guide Condé Nast Traveller recently selected eight ‘underrated’ UK summer holiday destinations, with North Wales’ Llŷn Peninsula making the list. For those in the know this comes as no surprise. The Llŷn Peninsula, or Pen Llŷn as it’s more often known locally, has long been popular, with visitors often returning year after year, and even, generation after generation. 

With nearly 100 miles of coastline, this little corner of North Wales is known for its abundance of beautiful beaches. From long stretches of golden sands to sheltered bays and hidden coves, whatever you’re looking for, there’s sure to be a beach to suit you.

Here’s a rundown of some of the Llŷn Peninsula’s best beaches.

Porth Neigwl - best for surfers

Porth Neigwl – best for surfers

Porth Neigwl, also known as Hell’s Mouth, is a sweeping, four mile long stretch of shoreline exposed to the full force of the Atlantic. Famous for its wild beauty and powerful waves, it’s the go-to spot for local surfers. Despite its ominous nickname, Porth Neigwl’s raw beauty and exhilarating surf make it one of the standout beaches of the Llŷn Peninsula. This beach is generally quiet, a peaceful place to enjoy beachcombing, dog walking and wildlife spotting, and a great spot to watch the sunset. Swimming is not recommended.

Car park: Yes

Cafe / shop: No

Public toilets: No

Dog-friendly: Yes

Porth Towyn – best for rockpooling 

Porth Towyn lies on the rugged northern coast of Pen Llŷn, near the small village of Tudweiliog. This beach is something of a hidden gem, flanked by grassy cliffs which give it a remote, secluded feel. This sandy beach is ideal for families and the waters are suitable for paddling, swimming and bodyboarding. To the far right of the beach are numerous rock pools which provide endless hours of fun for children and adults alike. Drinks, sandwiches and snacks are available at Cwt Tatws on the farmland above the beach.

Car park: Yes, limited roadside parking & car park at Towyn Farm

Cafe / shop: Yes

Public toilets: Customers of Cwt Tatws can use the toilets at Towyn Farm

Dog-friendly: Dogs are not allowed on this beach between 1st April and 30th September

Traeth Llanbedrog - best for families 

Traeth Llanbedrog – best for families 

This sheltered beach on the southern coast of Pen Llŷn is nestled at the base of Mynydd Tir y Cwmwd / Llanbedrog Headland. Renowned for its iconic, brightly painted National Trust beach huts, Llanbedrog is a firm favourite with families thanks to its shallow waters and good facilities. There is a large car park, public toilets, and a cafe/bistro right on the beach. Clear waters and gentle waves make this beach ideal for paddling and swimming.

Car park: Yes, large National Trust car park

Cafe / shop: Yes

Public toilets: Yes

Dog-friendly: Yes, with restrictions between 1st April and 30th September

Traeth Aberdaron - most accessible 

Traeth Aberdaron – most accessible 

Known as Pen Draw’r Byd (roughly the ‘End of the Earth’), Aberdaron lies on the westernmost tip of Pen Llŷn. The village forms a higgledy-piggledy collection of buildings which back onto the long expanse of beach. The large National Trust car park is just yards from the shore making this a great option for anyone requiring disabled access. 

This beach is a great all rounder, sheltered by headlands at both ends, with several shops, pubs, and cafes nearby, and a large car park with public toilets and showers. 

Car park: Yes, large National Trust car park at Porth y Swnt

Cafe / shop: Yes

Public toilets: Yes

Dog-friendly: Yes, dogs are welcome on the left-hand side of the slipway

Porth Towyn - best for rockpooling 

Porth Ceiriad – most secluded 

Access to this large, sandy beach is via a walk from the clifftop car park, across the fields at Nant y Big farm, and down a steep flight of steps. However, once reached this beach is one of the best. With glorious golden sands, sheltered at each end by the headland, Ceiriad is popular for watersports, particularly surfing, bodyboarding, kayaking and paddleboarding, although care should be taken as there are occasional rip tides. The remote location and lack of facilities make this beach considerably quieter than most in the area, ideal for those seeking a secluded spot to relax and unwind. 

Car park: Yes

Cafe / shop: No

Public toilets: No

Dog-friendly: Yes

Abersoch Harbour Beach - perfect for crabbing

Abersoch Harbour Beach – perfect for crabbing

Often overlooked in favour of Abersoch’s popular Main Beach / Porth Mawr, Harbour Beach is a real gem. When the tide is out this tiny beach transforms into a vast expanse of sand that’s often virtually empty bar the occasional tractor toing and froing to launch boats. This beach is easily accessed from the centre of the village and is perfect for paddling and skimming stones. The harbour wall is a popular crabbing spot, on summer evenings, expect to see families gathered around buckets and nets eagerly counting their catch. On Thursday evenings look out for the lifeboat launching for crew training.

Car park: Street parking

Cafe / shop: Beach is close to the village centre 

Public toilets: Within walking distance of village centre toilets

Dog-friendly: Yes, with restrictions between 1st April and 30th September

Morfa Nefyn & Porthdinllaen - most characterful

Morfa Nefyn & Porthdinllaen – most characterful

Perhaps the most famous of all Pen Llŷn’s beaches is Porthdinllaen. Known for the Ty Coch pub, Porthdinllaen is a tiny collection of cottages tucked beneath a steep headland, roughly 2 miles from neighbouring Morfa Nefyn. Accessed via a pleasant walk across the golf course or along the beach from Morfa, Porthdinllaen offers breathtaking views of Yr Eifil and is frequented by local fishermen who still land their catches here. Great for soaking in the atmosphere.

Car park: National Trust car park at Morfa Nefyn

Cafe / shop: Yes

Public toilets: Yes

Dog-friendly: Yes


Fancy staying on the Llŷn Peninsula? Check out our Top 5 Holiday Cottages on the Llŷn Peninsula

 
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